October 14-15, 2017 from 12-4pm

My studio will be open as part of Open House New York


 

 

Cue Mark (2017) / /  limited screenings: 

 

September 28, 7-9pm

Lubov

373 Broadway, #207
New York, NY 10013

rsvp: info@lubov.nyc

 

October 13, 7-9pm

Hercules Art Studio Program

25 Park Place, Fl. 3
New York, NY 10013

rsvp: info@herculesart.com

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Stephanie Barber
Laura Bartczak
Lucy Kerr
Aglaia Konrad
Janis Crystal Lipzin
Ellie Parker
Jenna Westra

 

Cue Mark brings together nine films by seven artists who share an affinity for the poetics of movement and a reverence for analogue cinema. These artists use their cameras to record and bring to light both object and performance and make permanent via photochemical processes. 

Janis Crystal Lipzin considers film to be a material located in the painterly realm, and engages with the material's sensory and optical qualities. Through hand processing her film and manipulating the emulsion, she reveals an expansion of the industrial Kodak color palette, alluding to the natural world where possible color expressions are enhanced. Her subjects in De Luce 1 & 2 include plant life and architecture, natural and built environments that dance with their recordings in modernist color field tableaus. 

The work of Aglaia Konrad is similarly concerned with the built environment, her film La Scala is a spatio-temporal continuum of the Brutalist residential building designed by Vittoriano Vigano for Andre Bloc (1956-1958, La Garda, San Felice, Italy). The camera pans in a soothing slow motion and traverses interior and exterior space fluidly, with reflections in the glass façade reading as double exposures. Her material concerns are in the apparatus; the optical system, aiming and reframing. She proposes the potential for film to embody the experience of architecture as sculpture. 

Where the moving camera animates the static sculptural architecture in La Scala, Jenna Westra's portrait of a dancer titled Static Movement Sundown insists on slowing down movement of the human body and allowing external forces of the camera, wind, and sun to intervene. Lucy Kerr's Bridge Piece and Laura Bartczak's Viscera are similarly grounded in choreography and performance, though the technical possibilities of stop motion and advanced editing effects pay homage to the "magic" of filmmaking. While Bridge Piece follows a dancer's sequence of lethargic efforts to stand up right, Bartczak's imagery offers frantic, strobe-like portraits of desert landscapes contrasted by split screen close-ups of a bouncing torso. 

Stephanie Barber's work 3 Peonies traverses ground that reads both violent and nurturing, where cut pink flowers are progressively covered with blue painters tape on a blood red ground. What begins as a reverence for natural beauty ends up pointing towards the abstract expressionism and color field work of high modernism which, in many cases eschewed the banality of such "natural" beauty. Mirroring by Ellie Parker reflects on the camera's ability to act as a Barthesian mirror to the past. 

 

Still, La Scala by Aglaia Konrad (2016), 16mm transfer to HD video (color), split-screen 4:3, 00:11:44

Still, La Scala by Aglaia Konrad (2016), 16mm transfer to HD video (color), split-screen 4:3, 00:11:44

Still, Viscera by Laura Bartczak (2016), Super 8mm transfer to HD video (color), split-screen 4:3, 00:03:40

Still, Viscera by Laura Bartczak (2016), Super 8mm transfer to HD video (color), split-screen 4:3, 00:03:40